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Sculpey=hard

Posted by Lyichir , Sep 30 2006 · 52 views

Creativity
Not the firm kind of hard, as it's actually pretty pliable before you bake it. No, I mean hard to use, especially for making masks. My first sculpey mask turned out good. (I'll post pictures if I ever stop being lazy drooling.gif ) But that had layers, not ridges like my second one has. Or LIPS. If Aanchir designs me another mask that's this hard to make, I'll strangle him. mad.gif

Anyway, here's my process for making masks.

Step 1: Take one Toa Inika head.
Step 2: Coat it in some kind of lubricant. (I used Armor-All and baby powder for my first mask, and I am using WD40 for my second.)
Step 3: Make a thin flat sheet of SculpeyIII using a pasta maker (If you own one. If not, you'll have to try something else.)
Step 4: Shape the thin sheet of SculpeyIII onto the Toa Inika head. Do this slowly and carefully to form it cleanly to the head. Cut the excess off with a paring knife.
Step 5: Reflatten the remaining sculpey, and use it in layers to add details and texture. Cut eyeholes and/or a mouth with the paring knife.
Step 6: This is the hard part. Carefully peel your mask off of the head. If it loses its shape, recoat the head in lubricant and reform the mask onto the head. If it is completely destroyed, start over. If it comes off perfectly on the first try, you have talent.
Step 7: With the completed mask off the head, place the mask on a paper lunch bag to put in the oven. Use the directions on the sculpey package to bake your mask.
Step 8: Well done! Wait for your completed mask to cool. Don't worry if it didn't turn out perfectly, it's a refined process that takes skill and effort to master.

And that ends our discussion on Sculpey masks. I can't wait to see yours!

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