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The 1st Shadow

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About The 1st Shadow

Year 10
  • Rank
    Dark Master of Light
  • Birthday 09/19/1993

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Creative Archipelago, BZ-Nui
  • Interests
    Hobbies: LEGO, BIONICLE, HERO Factory, drawing, reading, writing, and, most importantly, eating.

    TV: Sherlock, Doctor Who, Supernatural, Psyche

    Music: numerous Christian artists, and lots of classic rock (Kansas, Def Leppard, Yes, Rush, etc). Not big on rap or techno so much

Contact Methods

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    cebergren
  • Website URL
    http://cebergren.webs.com
  • LEGO.com Account
    Calen872

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  1. I think this is probably the most accurate description. Gold might have been the intended color, and Greg does often describe more fancy colors in the books than the sets would suggest, like how Mata Nui was described as gold in the TLR novelization. Real-life-wise, gold sockets would get brittle and break really easily, so making the Toa Ignika gold would have been a QC nightmare. Keetorange was the closest, tone-wise, so I can get behind the idea that it's silver, black, and "gold" to represent the countdown stages. That's an awesome thought and I'm accepting it as my new headcanon.
  2. Or they decided that actually speaking the words "fancy helmet" didn't quite roll off the tongue as well as "fancy mask," which makes sense. For one thing, the "A" in both words is pronounced more or less the same, and the following "C" and "S," respectively, produce the same sound, where "helmet" shares nothing in common with the sound of "fancy." So you end up with "fAn[S]y mASk" which sounds nicer and is more comfortable to pronounce. Just try saying "fancy helmet" out loud and let me know how ugly it sounds to you.
  3. Cheesy is correct. Toa generally focus their power through their hands and tools, but there have been a couple instances of Toa manipulating their element "telekinetically" without directly moving their hands or tools. The Nuva could do that elemental time-bomb thing, which didn't require anything more than focusing on a spot and setting the elemental charge for later. Regular Toa haven't shown such abilities much, if at all, and if they did, they were probably very experienced. That said, if a Toa of Sonics were talented enough to focus their powers without using their hands, they could, potentially, direct a blast of sound from their mouth. More likely, though, is that they would scream normally, and then use their powers to amplify (manipulation of element) the sound so it does more damage. This is probably the only scenario in which that could work.
  4. Chain lightning is a sub-power of the Lightning/Electricity element. In this case, Chain Lightning is just a more focused version of that one ability, while the elemental power offers a wider range to a lesser extent. It's possible that it's an ability that takes a lot of training to use, like how Takanuva had to struggle for a long time to learn how to make holograms of himself using his light powers, a Toa of Lightning probably could do it with a lot of training, because once the lightning leaves their body, they would have to redirect it between other targets, meaning it would require a lot of focus to direct and aim that particular ability.
  5. If I recall correctly, it was something Greg answered a long time ago, but it ended up being a longer version of "Here's my take, but don't think too much about it." Like, the twin suns above Metru Nui are actually the eyeholes, but there's two parts to it. 1) When the robot is active, it generates light of its own, and the movement of the "suns" and stars is attached to a sort of moving grid system that allows for day-night cycles (this is the part you don't think too much about). 2) When the robot is inactive, the stars still function, but the light of the suns is now whatever ambient light comes from outside the robot, not what it generates via lightstones or whatever, and the suns now become stationary while the stars only move a little bit. The other domes were supposedly lit by giant lightstones that during the day cycle kinda just made the whole sky bright. Because Greg was so vague about this, I assumed that the only "suns" were in Metru Nui and everywhere else just had a reasonably-bright artificial sky that would go dim during he night cycle. Like I said, he gave some vague answers, but there were just too many holes in them to paint a really clear picture.
  6. Huh. Been forever since I posted anything here, but I just noticed my 10-Year Tohu spinny. Yay! 

  7. I'd imagine that being inside a giant robot with miles of rock and metal between them and the real sun, the FN would be severely weakened. Unless, of course, they had been trained by the dragons the way Iroh, Aang, and Zuko were, and could tap into their more inner source of Fire. If that were the case, then maybe they would be able to take out a Matoran village or two. But consider their lack of familiarity with this world and it's inhabitants. Technologically, they would be outmatched. Biologically, they would be outmatched. Even if they caught the Matoran unawares, Matoran can be pretty hardy individuals. I suspect they might be forced to flee, but not many would be killed (almost none if they were Ta-, Vo- or Su-Matoran). By that time, if there were any nearby Toa, they would put up a fight and, due to their numbers, not be able to do much more than slow the Fire Nation down. Now, if the Brotherhood got wind of this, then Teridax might be concerned for the safety of his future slave-labor force and order the Brotherhood to engage in combat. Just two or three Makuta alone with their powers of Magnetism, Gravity, and the like would destroy any vessels used by the FN. From there, a quick application of their vacuum power drains the FN of their breath, and then they could use their powers of Shadow/Darkness to cut off the light around the FN. Now with no access to air, heat, and light, the FN would be rendered powerless ,and if they hadn't died from suffocation, then they would be taken prisoner by the Makuta for experimentation and the rest would be killed. Personally, I think the whole ordeal would end right there with the fact that they're cut off from the real sun and most firebenders didn't have the training received by the main characters I mentioned previously. No powers, no success.
  8. Ugly silver revamps of the heroes of our childhood. Describe the Toa Metru in a line.
  9. I always liked to interpret that weirdness as Teridax trying to perfect his acting. He's a skilled mimic, as we've seen, but even the best actors need to have some alone time to get into character. I like to think that he was asking himself questions out loud, and then fixing his impression. I know I've had to do that from time to time when doing voice work for projects. Sometimes, right in the middle of a recording, I'll have started off with one voice and somehow ended up slightly deviating in either the tone or the accent, and I have to reign it back in. Assuming that's what we're seeing, I like it because it does something unique with Teridax: it humanizes him. He's fallible, and he knows it. Everywhere else, he's seen as this overly manipulative dark god-like being pulling all the strings. But the one time we see him alone, we immediately see him trying to make sure he isn't messing up. He's perfecting his act and trying to stay in character.
  10. I'd say no, mainly on the basis that you would have one transparent color on the head of the figure while the rest of their body is a different color. Like, with Gali, you'd have a mostly blue figure with a random yellow/orange head, and the same eye color behind the visor wouldn't contrast as well. Sure, Tahu and Pohatu make it difficult with their eye colors and the inevitable mask colors LEGO went with, but personally, I think the best move was to make the mask be a close approximation of a transparent version of their armor color. Plus, it's more consistent with the collection of masks and looks better aesthetically. But that's just me.
  11. I think the official answer is that they get mixed in with the airship explanation. They were either used as storage containers or broken down and used as whatever was needed.
  12. Late to the party, but there was a thing I did years ago that I do regret doing. When I was in middle school (or early high school, can't remember which) I was really big on doing art with sunlight and a magnifying glass. (I had an art topic back when I first joined with some samples of my work. That was back on the old forum and I don't remember where the photos are now.) Anyway, I was inspired by the rugged look of some of the character models from the first three Bionicle movies. If you look at them closely, you can see some bits of the armor that aren't flat and smooth, but they're lined with ridges or other odd little markings. Now, what I did was I'd take pieces off the sets, go outside with them and burn similar markings onto the pieces themselves (including some masks) to make them slightly more screen-accurate. It was a horrible decision that ruined many of them visually. Fortunately, they all still function just fine, and I was able to replace them and reuse the burnt pieces on MOCs. So, not a total loss, but it did take a while to replace all the damaged parts. I think some of them might still need replacing. I'll have to check Sidorak's shoulders...
  13. I think someone asked Greg about it a long time ago, but it's such a minor piece of trivia that BS01 doesn't consider it worth wasting page space to say "When Takua donned the Avohkii, his Pakari was absorbed into his being during the transformation and was lost." The Mask of Light novelization clearly mentions that he placed the Avohkii over his own mask, which initiated his transformation. Because it's never addressed later, the most logical thing to assume is that the mask was just absorbed by the transformation.
  14. So, my boss and coworkers and I discuss this every so often, and I've got it down to where I rank the LEGO Movies in this order: Batman Movie--it felt more streamlined and amusing and easier to follow than TLM The LEGO Movie--it was the first in the series and established a style and form that the others would follow, albeit with some aspects f it feeling jumbled (which makes sense, as it follows the play patterns of a child's mind, so it's expected to be a bit odd) but I otherwise loved it. TLM2--Like the Batman Movie, it was more streamlined and consistent, but it has the downside of being slightly less memorable and feels very much like a regular movie sequel in that the world and characters have already been established and the plot unfortunately makes it too similar to the original to be memorable on its own. It has it's moments, but not enough to measure up to the original. Though maybe I have to watch it a few more times in order to appreciate it more. The next movie they will produce. And the movie after that. And maybe the third one a few years after that, should be pretty good. The LEGO Ninjago Movie--Unfortunately, I really didn't like this one as much as I hoped to. It had none of the charm of the original LEGO Movie or the Ninjago series and most of the jokes were really forced and felt kinda bland in execution. Story was consistent, but wasn't engaging enough for me to care about it all that much. It gave us some fun new sets, but that was about it. It butchered the characters' personalities in all the wrong ways and, while I get that it was supposed to be its own thing, it just fell flat on its face and no amount of star power or my loyalty to the Ninjago brand could save it in my eyes. Yeah, there's my two cents. Don't spend it all in one place.
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