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Lyichir

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About Lyichir

BioniLUG Members
Year 13
  • Rank
    A Chir Brother
  • Birthday 03/29/1991

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Here
  • Interests
    Bionicle, Lego, Nintendo games, drawing, writing, the internet.

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  1. Saw this video the other day. I'm loving the Hidden Side characters so far!
  2. My observation, at least, has been that, before the Michael Bay movies, Transformers was primarily a toy line with an associated story, but I don't remember wanting or seeing advertisements for Michael Bay Transformers toys that much. The advertising and cultural relevance was almost exclusively on the movies. BIONICLE has only existed in the first phase. My hope with this Christian Faber stuff is that it could successfully transition to phase two. It's true that Hasbro is a little more involved in the media angle of their brands than Lego is (unlike Lego, they have started their own movie and TV studios to produce content based on their brands), but make no mistake—toys are still their primary business. As someone who has worked there, the toys are a big deal, and like with Bionicle tend to shape the direction and emphasis of the story content. And honestly, I don't really want to see a Bionicle that's divorced from the toy aspect. As a Lego fan, I doubt a version of Bionicle like that could ever really live up to the Bionicle of my childhood, in which the story and the toys reinforced one another.
  3. Nah, they're Bright Reddish Violet (Magenta on Bricklink). Which is nonetheless a cool color to get Technic parts in!
  4. I always kind of wished there were horses for them to ride. The siege weapons in the third year kind of scratched that itch, but not really.
  5. To be honest... I don't mind. Minifigure height by and large is distorted from "real" proportions, and using the taller legs opens up a wide variety of issues that make the figures harder to use in displays than typical figures (for example, preventing figures from sitting in normal chairs or fitting through typical door frames). In general I think those were an experiment that didn't really prove their worth, and am grateful that figures like the new Toy Story figs have moved away from them and back toward standard length legs for even fairly lanky characters.
  6. A lot of the parts are printed (especially the stripes). New Elementary has more details in its review.
  7. I've read that the soundtrack will get a wider physical release at an unspecified later date. No idea about whether the score will as well or not.
  8. I would say equal. Yeah, that was my tentative opinion coming out of my first viewing as well, and a second viewing has only cemented that. Both movies are clever, funny, and great at pulling at your heartstrings (hard to watch either one without tearing up a little at the most emotional moments).
  9. No, not really at this point. Cinematic universes are a pretty tall order (at least distinguished from plain old franchises of movies with sequels) and considering how much I disliked the sprawl of the G1 story I'd much prefer one good Bionicle movie or TV series, with the possibility of sequels or additional seasons, rather than a commitment to a mess of sprawling side-stories and overambitious crossovers. That, or just one good Bionicle movie as part of the Lego Movie universe.
  10. For me it's hard to judge the first against the second and come out with either one at a clear advantage. Any drawbacks of this one feel like they're made up for by a less male-centered narrative and some amazing musical numbers.
  11. Good review! This set is quite the glow-up compared to the original, which looked and felt very much like a box with wheels (even compared to some of the earlier Power Miners sets that used that drill piece). It’s great how they’ve designed the function so that it can be activated either while driving or ar a standstill. And the brick built giant stone warrior is a great addition.
  12. The linked article features a picture of the minifigure, who wears the same collar used for William Shakespeare in the first movie.
  13. As far as I can remember it's never NOT been a thing. The Lego video games have been packed with humor dating back to the first one (Lego Island). And even before that, the Lego Mania magazine comics tended to feature plenty of humor. Even for licensed themes like Lego Star Wars, the earliest sets featured silly comics in the instructions, often involving whichever character was featured in the set getting into some sort of crash or scrape and having to rebuild their ship into an alternate model better equipped to deal with whatever pickle they'd found themselves in. When you get down to it, they're toys. There's an inherent childishness to them that is better off embraced than avoided.
  14. I don't want to dive too far into this debate, which is at risk of overwhelming the actual interesting subject matter of the topic as a whole. But I can answer this—I remember reading that Lego went with Polynesian languages and an island setting to help it stand out from the mainstream European fantasy that was taking off in franchises like Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings. Also, I also think I remember hearing that Lego sourced more of the names from a proto-Polynesian language, rather than directly from Maori. The reason the issue arose is because of the extant Polynesian languages, Maori is the one that has the most in common with that earlier language, leading to the issue of certain terms having culturally important meanings to indigenous people of New Zealand. Ultimately, I think Lego's response to that whole kerfuffle was a good one, changing the names that caused the offense to replacements (most of which were homophones anyway). It doesn't hurt anyone to err toward cultural sensitivity.
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