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--The first ever feature-length film was Australian, ran for 60 minutes, is called The Story of the Kelly Gang, and is based upon the life of Australian bushranger and folk hero Ned Kelly (and his gang). Made in 1906, it featured one of the original suits of armour worn by the Kelly Gang (believed to have belonged to gang deputy Joe Byrne). Only 17 minutes survive of the original 60.

 

--AC/DC's lead singer, Brian Johnson does not sing their classic song It's A Long Way To The Top out of respect for the deceased lead singer Bon Scott, whose signature song it was.

 

--In total, Bach had twenty children--seven with his first wife (of which only three survived into adulthood, and two had musical careers of their own; and thirteen with his second wife (out of which six survived into adulthood), two becoming significant musicians.

Edited by Erasmus Graves

"Mutiny, Booty and Entropy"  - The Three Vices of the Frostelus

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The Nintendo Entertainment System was legendary among gamers for having some of the hardest retro games ever. This was because of the console's limitations. Developers couldn't put much into the games in the first place, so to give you a bang for your buck, they cranked up the difficulty to make you earn your victory.

 

One of the most powerful MMORPG enemies is Vordred from AdventureQuest Worlds. What makes him so powerful is the fact that he's absolutely invincible. No attack will damage him and his attacks aren't too special themselves, but he'll break you down if you stick around. Funnily enough, Vordred is also a boss in the game's story, but he's remarkably pathetic against most players.

 

There's a fruit (the name of which escapes me) that's really big, is covered in thorns, and smells like rotting flesh. It also grows on trees and could injure or possibly kill someone if it fell out.

 

Matt Walst could have joined Three Days Grace with his brother Brad from the start, but decided to start his own band, My Darkest Days, with his friends. Due to Matt's decision, Three Days Grace only had three members: Adam Gontier, Brad Walst, and Neil Sanderson. The trio would release an album and later recruit a fourth member, Barry Stock. When Matt replaced Adam, My Darkest Days was put on hiatus.

 

Spider-Man was predicted to be a universal failure due to most people disliking spiders. The opposite happened; Spider-Man proved to be a huge hit.

 

During his older comics, Superman used to be pretty mean at times, especially when dishing out some justice. Some of his punishments were remarkably cruel, such as blasting a schoolboy into space on a rocket ship after he disobeyed Lois Lane, who was undercover as a teacher.

 

The first frisbees were metal pie pans. Later on, the second version of the classic yard toy was reportedly roadkill. Finally, somebody went ahead and created the iconic plastic version, which was significantly less dangerous and disgusting.

 

The ancient Egyptians utilized boomerang-like tools to throw at birds and kill them. The tools, despite the resemblance to boomerangs, wouldn't circle back when you threw them.

 

While on the subject of ancient Egyptians, Anubis, the god relating to death and mummification, actually didn't have a jackal head. His head was most likely that of the African golden wolf. Also, despite being one of the most well-known and recognizable figures in Egyptian mythology, Anubis didn't play too much of a role in it.

 

Super Buu of Dragon Ball Z has one of the highest confirmed amount of kills in anime, having killed over 7 billion people in less than a minute.

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There's a fruit (the name of which escapes me) that's really big, is covered in thorns and smells like rotting flesh. It also grows on trees and could injure or possibly kill someone if it fell out.

That, my friends, is called jackfruit. It smells sort of like a cross between rotting onions and decomposing flesh, but it tastes very sweet and is good in a jam (jelly to you Americans).

 

--Acclaimed crime and western writer Elmore Leonard, despite receiving a number of lifetime achievement awards, only won two awards for an individual novel (which happened to be some of the most prestigious awards in the crime-writing industry). For La Brava he won the Edgar Award for Best Novel 1985 and the Martin Beck Award 1985.

 

--Science-fiction writer Robert A. Heinlein invented an early (but sophisticated) design for the water bed in an attempt to create the perfect hospital bed. Heinlein never built his creation.

 

--Ragtime (1981) was James Cagney's last film as well as his first appearance on the silver screen in ten years.

Edited by Erasmus Graves
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"Mutiny, Booty and Entropy"  - The Three Vices of the Frostelus

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There's a fruit (the name of which escapes me) that's really big, is covered in thorns and smells like rotting flesh. It also grows on trees and could injure or possibly kill someone if it fell out.

That, my friends, is called jackfruit. It smells sort of like a cross between rotting onions and decomposing flesh, but it tastes very sweet and is good in a jam (jelly to you Americans).
Ah, that's right! Thank you once again! Funny how something that smells so bad would taste so sweet. Do you know if the jam (I may be American, but I call it jam out of habit) keeps the original odor?

 

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There's a small chance that the mystery of the Roanoke Colony has already been solved. Everybody probably packed up and went to Croatone Island, but this was never confirmed by a firsthand witness. Therefore, it's still a mystery.

 

The Holy Bible doesn't have a single established canon.

 

The popular Fairy Tail manga was supposed to run until its tenth volume, but the fans wanted more and made the creator realize he really did want to keep going.

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mindeth the cobwebs

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The Holy Bible doesn't have a single established canon.

Nikean Council? Traditionally, anything that crosses that is considered heresy. I want to say Chalcedon as well, but that council led to many stupid wars that resulted in successful Muslim Conquests over Christian land and eventual assimilation (Syria, Egypt, etc).

 

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Serious Sam's full name is actually Samuel Stone.

 

The Ancient Roman war, the Social War, is a mistranslation, and should be called the Allied War or War fo the Allies; which refers to Roman Italian allies revolting after unfair representation, which led to Roman Republic's eventual destruction of the troublesome Samnites via ethnic cleansing by dictator Sulla Felix (who were a pain in Rome's backside since the time before time). People have been aware of this error in translation in error for a while now, but much like the erroneous usage of 'Byzantine Empire', it is still used out of tradition.

 

Sulla Felix, though married and had children, only used his family for political means and actually had a life-long male lover.

 

Gaius Marius was the rival and archenemy of the tyrant Sulla, and spent his life fighting to take down and keep in check this powerful person. Despite this, his nephew Julius Caesar would follow in his uncle's rival's footsteps.

 

Sparta may have been known for having no walls for most of it's existance, but with the rise of the Roman Republic and later Empire, the ancient city-state had to build walls and adapt it's soldiers to better defend its independence against the Italian superpower. Sparta was the last free Greek city-state to fall to the Romans, which was done under Emperor Tiberius Caesar.

 

Pyrrhus of Epirus, legendary king of Epirus and Makedon and was on the verge of uniting all of Greece under a single empire, never lost a battle in his eponymous Pyrrhic War against the rising power of the Roman Republic. However, each victory he sustained was so counterproductive that he eventually had to sign a treaty of surrender. He famously said, "If we are victorious in one more battle with the Romans, we shall be utterly ruined". Thus, the term Pyrrhic Victory was coined.

 

Rome and Carthage were actually allies in the wars against the rising power of Pyrhus, king of Epirus. After his surrender, he famously said, "What a wrestling ground we are leaving, my friends, for the Carthaginians and the Romans.", foreshadowing the later colossal Punic Wars. He watched in entertainment from Greece as the two former-allies then erupted in massive warfare against one another.

Edited by Iaredios the Hip Historian

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The Holy Bible doesn't have a single established canon.

Nikean Council? Traditionally, anything that crosses that is considered heresy. I want to say Chalcedon as well, but that council led to many stupid wars that resulted in successful Muslim Conquests over Christian land and eventual assimilation (Syria, Egypt, etc).

 

Hate to be a spelling-Nazi but that's the Nicaean Council (better known as the Council of Nicaea). The Council of Nikaea is a Warhammer 30k (pre-Horus Heresy) event where the Emperor banned the use of psychic powers amongst the legions of Adeptus Astartes and disbanded the Librarians - though this was not to last. The most grievously affected of all the legions was the (eventually to turn traitor) Thousand Sons, who sported immense numbers of psykers within their legion. The incident held Primarch Magnus to trial and was not only the (inadvertent) cause of the Horus Heresy but the emancipation of the Thousand Sons and cause of the Burning of Prospero.

The name is a blatantly obvious allusion to the Council of Nicaea.

For more information on defendant POV in Nikea see A Thousand Sons by Graham McNeill, and for a prosecutor's POV see Prospero Burns by Dan Abnett.

Edited by Erasmus Graves
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"Mutiny, Booty and Entropy"  - The Three Vices of the Frostelus

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The Holy Bible doesn't have a single established canon.

Nikean Council? Traditionally, anything that crosses that is considered heresy. I want to say Chalcedon as well, but that council led to many stupid wars that resulted in successful Muslim Conquests over Christian land and eventual assimilation (Syria, Egypt, etc).

 

Hate to be a spelling-Nazi but that's the Nicaean Council (better known as the Council of Nicaea). The Council of Nikaea is a Warhammer 30k (pre-Horus Heresy) event where the Emperor banned the use of psychic powers amongst the legions of Adeptus Astartes and disbanded the Librarians - though this was not to last. The most grievously affected of all the legions was the (eventually to turn traitor) Thousand Sons, who sported immense numbers of psykers within their legion. The incident held Primarch Magnus to trial and was not only the (inadvertent) cause of the Horus Heresy but the emancipation of the Thousand Sons and cause of the Burning of Prospero.

The name is a blatantly obvious allusion to the Council of Nicaea.

For more information on defendant POV in Nikea see A Thousand Sons by Graham McNeill, and for a prosecutor's POV see Prospero Burns by Dan Abnett.

 

Nikaea is the original Greek spelling. They don't use C's, only K's; similar examples can be found in: Konstantinopolis, Seleukid, Makedon, Ktesiphon, and plenty of others. The city was named after the Greek god Nike. So the only typo I did was forgetting an A. B-)

Edited by Iaredios the Hip Historian

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Ah, right. Thanks

 

 

 

 

The Holy Bible doesn't have a single established canon.

Nikean Council? Traditionally, anything that crosses that is considered heresy. I want to say Chalcedon as well, but that council led to many stupid wars that resulted in successful Muslim Conquests over Christian land and eventual assimilation (Syria, Egypt, etc).

 

Hate to be a spelling-Nazi but that's the Nicaean Council (better known as the Council of Nicaea). The Council of Nikaea is a Warhammer 30k (pre-Horus Heresy) event where the Emperor banned the use of psychic powers amongst the legions of Adeptus Astartes and disbanded the Librarians - though this was not to last. The most grievously affected of all the legions was the (eventually to turn traitor) Thousand Sons, who sported immense numbers of psykers within their legion. The incident held Primarch Magnus to trial and was not only the (inadvertent) cause of the Horus Heresy but the emancipation of the Thousand Sons and cause of the Burning of Prospero.

The name is a blatantly obvious allusion to the Council of Nicaea.

For more information on defendant POV in Nikea see A Thousand Sons by Graham McNeill, and for a prosecutor's POV see Prospero Burns by Dan Abnett.

 

Nikaea is the original Greek spelling. They don't use C's, only K's; similar examples can be found in: Konstantinopolis, Seleukid, Makedon, Ktesiphon, and plenty of others. The city was named after the Greek god Nike. So the only typo I did was forgetting an A. B-)

 

Ah, right. That clears it up. Man, that allusion isn't even an allusion any more--it's reuse of a name.

 

--If you sport a beard and are caught wearing glasses and sipping a latte, you will most likely be judged a hipster - unless you're a visually-impaired sailor who like coffee.

--George Orwell said Indian tea was the best tea, and was against the use of sugar in tea.

--Notorious bestselling two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning author/journalist/filmmaker/activist Norman Mailer had six wives and nine children.

 

Here's a useful fact for the DC fans out there: The trailer to the animated adaptation of the Moore/Bolland comic The Killing Joke has been released.

Edited by Erasmus Graves

"Mutiny, Booty and Entropy"  - The Three Vices of the Frostelus

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Ah, right. Thanks

 

 

 

 

The Holy Bible doesn't have a single established canon.

Nikean Council? Traditionally, anything that crosses that is considered heresy. I want to say Chalcedon as well, but that council led to many stupid wars that resulted in successful Muslim Conquests over Christian land and eventual assimilation (Syria, Egypt, etc).

 

Hate to be a spelling-Nazi but that's the Nicaean Council (better known as the Council of Nicaea). The Council of Nikaea is a Warhammer 30k (pre-Horus Heresy) event where the Emperor banned the use of psychic powers amongst the legions of Adeptus Astartes and disbanded the Librarians - though this was not to last. The most grievously affected of all the legions was the (eventually to turn traitor) Thousand Sons, who sported immense numbers of psykers within their legion. The incident held Primarch Magnus to trial and was not only the (inadvertent) cause of the Horus Heresy but the emancipation of the Thousand Sons and cause of the Burning of Prospero.

The name is a blatantly obvious allusion to the Council of Nicaea.

For more information on defendant POV in Nikea see A Thousand Sons by Graham McNeill, and for a prosecutor's POV see Prospero Burns by Dan Abnett.

 

Nikaea is the original Greek spelling. They don't use C's, only K's; similar examples can be found in: Konstantinopolis, Seleukid, Makedon, Ktesiphon, and plenty of others. The city was named after the Greek god Nike. So the only typo I did was forgetting an A. B-)

 

Ah, right. That clears it up. Man, that allusion isn't even an allusion any more--it's reuse of a name.

 

--If you sport a beard and are caught wearing glasses and sipping a latte, you will most likely be judged a hipster - unless you're a visually-impaired sailor who like coffee.

--George Orwell said Indian tea was the best tea, and was against the use of sugar in tea.

--Notorious bestselling two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning author/journalist/filmmaker/activist Norman Mailer had six wives and nine children.

 

Here's a useful fact for the DC fans out there: The trailer to the animated adaptation of the Moore/Bolland comic The Killing Joke has been released.

It's finally out, after all of these years?! I know what I am getting next on Amazon! (...along with the Emperor's New Groove)

 

Despite the Abbasid Caliph  Harun al-Rashid Abbasid purposefully making himself look evil in his book 1,001 Arabian Nights as a joke, he was actually kind of evil. Apparently, he was oblivious to this as he ordered Jihad upon his enemies, stole mathematical achievements from India and took credit for them, and massacred the families of his political rivals out of paranoia (no evidence). Yeah, nice guy.

Edited by Iaredios the Hip Historian

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Testing out the double-post feature. if this is was a bad idea, simply merge this with the previous post. Thank you.

 

So I found about a messed up person (another one...) a couple of days ago.

 

Roman Emperor Justinian II Heraklian was, unlike the first Justinian, not-so-Great. He was a horrible ruler who ruled arrogantly with an iron fist  and ticked everyone off, especially the common people as he combined the elected office of Consul with the Emperor, and heavily taxed them to oblivion with threat of execution, just to fund an overly extravagant life.  Eventually, the entire country revolted against him (I think bodyguards and family as well) and captured him in his decadent throne room without a little fight as he was not a fighter. As per the religiously nutty thinking of post-Theodosius Roman Empire, the rebels held him down and sliced his entire nose off as they believed that only those with un-flawed faces could be emperor (who was, in their absurdity, the representation of God of Earth, a royal pope if you will, theoretically greater religious authority then the imperial patriarchs). So with his face scarred 'beyond rule' (or something like that), they simply exiled him and he was nicknamed Justinian the Slit-Nosed (think Red-Skull's nose). That wasn't the last of him, however, as he conducted a conspiracy with assassinations and bribery aplenty that, with the help of a gathered barbarian army, resulted in him being Roman Emperor again, this time with a gold prosthetic nose fit over his face. He ruled for a while until the people grew the inner-strength to fight against his tyranny once more and this time they killed him.

10c3925c982d5a70a383cb51eb3f9cb7.jpg

There is another picture that shows him without the prosthesis, but i thought I would spare you all the nightmares.

 

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Gaius Julius Caesar actually had a son by blood, and it was with his mistress Cleopatra VII(7th) Philopator Ptolemy, last independent Pharaoh of Egypt. The boy's name was Caesarion. Marc Antony started a relationship with the Queen to have an ally against his enemy Octavian and possibly act as a guardian-father to young Caesarion to further his own goals. While the two had a complicated relationship, at least Caesarion was protected. Upon Marc's death after the great Battle of Actinium and Cleopatra VII killing herself, Octavian went to Egypt to solidify his rule, having his step-brother Pharaoh Caesarion murdered, thence absorbing Egypt so that he could have absolute, uncontested rule in his new Roman Empire.

Edited by Iaredios the Hip Historian

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Barack Obama, the current President of the United States, is a huge fan of Conan the Barbarian/Cimmerian and collects all the books and comic books.


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--Cimmeria is actually an ancient name for Crimea. So, if a guy in Crimea has the name Conan, he would truly be Conan the Cimmerian. 

 

--Barack Obama's fanboying of Conan the Barbarian led to a comic miniseries entitled Barack the Barbarian, which features Obama as a sword & sorcery barbarian hero who gets involved in a series of events with a suspicious similarity to the 44th President of the US's rise to power. Indeed, it's possible to know nothing of American politics and be able to read this as an almost-pure S&S adventure, because the political satire is manifest in dialogue - it's more Twain and Swift and Voltaire than Mad magazine.

 

--In the Classic Doctor Who serial ​The Mind of Evil,​ the Master listens to an excerpt of the song 'The Devil's Triangle Part II' by English prog-rock band King Crimson.

 

--Ennio Morricone, possibly the greatest film music composer ever to conduct an orchestra, finally won an actual Oscar (he'd only received an honorary one previously) for his score for 2015's The Hateful Eight.

 

--The arrangement for Lux Aeterna by Clint Mansell heard in the Two Towers trailer is known as Requiem for a Tower.

 

--Johnny Depp played Donald Trump in Funny or Die.

 

--Kurt Russell supplied the Elvis voice for Forrest Gump. Russell actually played a minor role in the Elvis movie It Happened at the World's Fair, and later played the King himself in a 1979 film entitled Elvis.

 

--The two most influential crime fiction authors over the past thirty-two or so years are: James Ellroy and Elmore Leonard.

Edited by Erasmus Graves

"Mutiny, Booty and Entropy"  - The Three Vices of the Frostelus

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--Cimmeria is actually an ancient name for Crimea. So, if a guy in Crimea has the name Conan, he would truly be Conan the Cimmerian. 

Actually depends on the time frame. The Cimmerians at some point migrated south of the Caucasus mountains and often invaded the Hittites. Between barbarian Cimmerians, imperialistic Assyrians, and raiding Sea Peoples, the Hittites sure had their hands full.

 

Cimmeria and Crimea do have similar names, is there evidence that they are actually connected? I know that they lived either right next to or atop another so I wouldn't be surprised if they were the same. Also, were Cimmerians Sarmatian, Scythian, or their own individual group of people?

Edited by Iaredios the Hip Historian

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Cashews come from a fruit found in Africa.

 

The first dinosaur named was the Megalosaurus back in 1824.

 

There was a war called the War of Jenkins' Ear which was started between England and Spain in the years of 1739 to 1748, after some captain named Robert Jenkins got his ear cut off by a Spanish captain named Fandino once he accused Jenkins of smuggling. Then Jenkins got his ear presented to Parliament where they declared a war against Spain.

 

Definitely an interesting start to a war.


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There was a war called the War of Jenkins' Ear which was started between England and Spain in the years of 1739 to 1748, after some captain named Robert Jenkins got his ear cut off by a Spanish captain named Fandino once he accused Jenkins of smuggling. Then Jenkins got his ear presented to Parliament where they declared a war against Spain.

 

Definitely an interesting start to a war.

Was it England specifically or Great Britain? I ask because of the dates given. Either way, the two powers had been rivals since England landed in Belize and the Reformation so i think they took any excuse they could find to fight each other. :lol:


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I really can't remember, bro. I'll look it up.

 

Looked it up. Specifically it was BRITAIN, so probably the combo of Scotland and England.


Hey, I'm Fatorak. I made this account back in November for the Golden Mask contest, but I decided I might as well use it for something more useful. So yeah, I'm gonna be more active on here, or at least TRY to be!

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--Cimmeria is actually an ancient name for Crimea. So, if a guy in Crimea has the name Conan, he would truly be Conan the Cimmerian. 

Actually depends on the time frame. The Cimmerians at some point migrated south of the Caucasus mountains and often invaded the Hittites. Between barbarian Cimmerians, imperialistic Assyrians, and raiding Sea Peoples, the Hittites sure had their hands full.

 

Cimmeria and Crimea do have similar names, is there evidence that they are actually connected? I know that they lived either right next to or atop another so I wouldn't be surprised if they were the same. Also, were Cimmerians Sarmatian, Scythian, or their own individual group of people?

 

Yes & no. Cimmeria is an ancient name for Crimea, that much we know. But if the Cimmerians who invaded the Hittites ended up there, we don't know. There's some evidence linking them to the Welsh (who are presumed to be descended from the people of Troy), but that's not quite certain. There has been some speculation that they finally settled in Cappadocia, but that is uncertain.

The Cimmerians were their own individual group of people. They were displaced by the nomadic Scythians from the Pontiac Steppe.

 

--Elvis Presley once took his wife and two friends on a midnight trip to Denver, Colorado on his private jet the Lisa Marie. His goal? To sample the peanut butter, bacon and jam inside French white bread that is Fool's Gold Loaf. 22 of the loaves were consumed that night, washed down with champagne.


"Mutiny, Booty and Entropy"  - The Three Vices of the Frostelus

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--Cimmeria is actually an ancient name for Crimea. So, if a guy in Crimea has the name Conan, he would truly be Conan the Cimmerian. 

Actually depends on the time frame. The Cimmerians at some point migrated south of the Caucasus mountains and often invaded the Hittites. Between barbarian Cimmerians, imperialistic Assyrians, and raiding Sea Peoples, the Hittites sure had their hands full.

 

Cimmeria and Crimea do have similar names, is there evidence that they are actually connected? I know that they lived either right next to or atop another so I wouldn't be surprised if they were the same. Also, were Cimmerians Sarmatian, Scythian, or their own individual group of people?

 

Yes & no. Cimmeria is an ancient name for Crimea, that much we know. But if the Cimmerians who invaded the Hittites ended up there, we don't know. There's some evidence linking them to the Welsh (who are presumed to be descended from the people of Troy), but that's not quite certain. There has been some speculation that they finally settled in Cappadocia, but that is uncertain.

The Cimmerians were their own individual group of people. They were displaced by the nomadic Scythians from the Pontiac Steppe.

 

--Elvis Presley once took his wife and two friends on a midnight trip to Denver, Colorado on his private jet the Lisa Marie. His goal? To sample the peanut butter, bacon and jam inside French white bread that is Fool's Gold Loaf. 22 of the loaves were consumed that night, washed down with champagne.

 

Ah, so the one-breasted Scythian Amazons routed them from their home? That explains why they moved.

 

--

I don't know if this one is useless or useful, since it has the lesson to not mess with history and it is still kind of relevant. I find it to be in a grey area:

Despite the Republic of Turkey's attempts to rewrite history and give Turks greater validity concerning being on Anatolia before Greeks and Armenians, they historically are not connected to Hittites as the government once tried to claim. Turks actually hail from the Eurasian Steppes, where the earliest record of them, going under the ancient name Gokturk, dates back to the Han Empire of China, placing said Gokturks as slaves to the dominant Xiongnu and Rouron in those ancient times, who eventually rebelled against the latter masters and chased them west. The Turks first appeared in Anatolia en masse with the large-scale invasion led by Seljuk Empire Sultan  Muhammed 'Alp Arlsan' Seljuk and was largely turkified by the successor-states Seljuk Sultanate of Rum (Rome) and the Ottoman Empire.

 

Though people try to connect the Xiongnu with the Huns that invaded Europe, there is a three hundred year gap between the destruction of the Xiongnu and the arrival of the Huns, and it does not take 300 years to travel across the steppes.

 

Despite being known as 'mexican food', the taco and burrito were actually invented in Italy.

 

Consuming large amounts of fruit juice will actually make your feces smell like a distorted variation. Quite the disgusting, yet familiar scent.

 

This picture of an indian ocean giant is quite ugly. It is also very loyal to the source material, Sinbad the Voyager.

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Another useless fact is that I read that part of the story after eating an appetizer and waiting for my main course, and i slightly felt sick while reading it. That part of the story was quite disturbing.

Edited by Iaredios the Hip Historian

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I got a history fact of my own! Abraham Lincoln once lost his hat when a loud bang startled the horse he was riding on. The hat was later found with a hole on each side. The bang was from a failed assassination attempt made by an unknown sniper.

 

In the Star Wars lore, the planet Tatooine has two suns. Due to real-life effects the sun's rays can have on a person, Luke Skywalker and Ben Kenobi look older than they are due to increased sun exposure.

 

During the early days of the manga version of H***sing (censorship due to filter), the main character Alucard's attire was changed due to it heavily resembling the clothing of Vash the Stampede from Trigun.

 

It's said that Mesopotamians invented a battery in ancient times. I only have one question. What did they need batteries for?

 

A man once died by laughing for 15 minutes straight while watching a TV show. His wife wrote a letter to the makers of the show thanking them for making her husband's final moments so enjoyable for him.

 

Breaking Benjamin's song "Blow Me Away" was written specifically for Halo 2. The song is still present in the Master Chief Collection, but only when you've set the game to the old graphics.

 

Speaking of Halo, Combat Evolved was supposed to have an alternate story where Master Chief rediscovers Cortana in the control room and finds her mad with power. With said power, she would want to take over the Halo and the universe.

The story would be significantly different if she betrayed Chief this early!

 

 

During BIONICLE's first run, the story team would get together and discuss what they would do for the next year. They would primarily focus on the Toa team. The question was, "Do we bring in a new team, or focus on the one from this year?" I guess since the Toa Metru/Hordika and Inika/Mahri were all stemming from 2001-2003 characters, the story team wanted to see more of certain characters that they liked.

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mindeth the cobwebs

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It's said that Mesopotamians invented a battery in ancient times. I only have one question. What did they need batteries for?

 

 

To power the spaceships the ancient astronauts gave them, duh.

 

​Speaking of, said batteries are an "OOPart": an out-of-place artifact. Most fringe theorists believe they're evidence of alien contact in human history, or time travel. Other examples are a nail embedded in sandstone discovered in a quarry, and a terracotta head of seemingly Roman origin in a Pre-Columbian burial site in Mexico. Most, however, can be chalked up to hoaxes, terrible attempts at dating the artifacts, or even, in the case of the Abydos "helicopter", pareidolia.

 

​Others are still unexplained, or at least have plausible explanations for their existence, such as the totally awesome Antikythera mechanism.

 

​And since this reminded me of it for some reason: a well-known urban legend is the Bunnyman, an enigmatic figure who haunts the titular "Bunnyman bridge" in Fairfax County, Virginia. The most popular depiction of him is a man in a bunny costume who attacks people with an axe. He walks the line between being a paranormal and a physical entity, with one version of the legend stating that he's a ghost that comes out on Halloween, and another depicting him as your classic slasher flick villain. Interestingly enough, he's rooted in two police reports which were closed for lack of evidence and lead to some legend-brewing hysteria.

 

​Because of all this, the bridge has become a popular "legend tripping" spot for teenagers looking to have the heck scared out of 'em. I've made it a goal to visit there one day and just go full Ghost Adventures on the place.


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It's said that Mesopotamians invented a battery in ancient times. I only have one question. What did they need batteries for?

 

 

To power the spaceships the ancient astronauts gave them, duh.

 

​Speaking of, said batteries are an "OOPart": an out-of-place artifact. Most fringe theorists believe they're evidence of alien contact in human history, or time travel. Other examples are a nail embedded in sandstone discovered in a quarry, and a terracotta head of seemingly Roman origin in a Pre-Columbian burial site in Mexico. Most, however, can be chalked up to hoaxes, terrible attempts at dating the artifacts, or even, in the case of the Abydos "helicopter", pareidolia.

 

​Others are still unexplained, or at least have plausible explanations for their existence, such as the totally awesome Antikythera mechanism.

 

​And since this reminded me of it for some reason: a well-known urban legend is the Bunnyman, an enigmatic figure who haunts the titular "Bunnyman bridge" in Fairfax County, Virginia. The most popular depiction of him is a man in a bunny costume who attacks people with an axe. He walks the line between being a paranormal and a physical entity, with one version of the legend stating that he's a ghost that comes out on Halloween, and another depicting him as your classic slasher flick villain. Interestingly enough, he's rooted in two police reports which were closed for lack of evidence and lead to some legend-brewing hysteria.

 

​Because of all this, the bridge has become a popular "legend tripping" spot for teenagers looking to have the heck scared out of 'em. I've made it a goal to visit there one day and just go full Ghost Adventures on the place.

 

Why would they be interested in space that early?

 

Could those artifacts be planted by somebody? I mean, it's not like aliens and time travelers really do exist, right? Right?

 

Oh, I've heard of the Bunnyman! Fool got hit by a train, but the police could hear laughing shortly after. My theory was that a bystander thought the scene looked comical. Why? Because the Bunnyman seriously wore a bunny suit everywhere he went and screamed about trespassers. If I were attacked by that guy, he would win because I'd be too busy laughing. But would it be the axe or the laughter that kills me first?

 

The bridge looks seriously creepy at night, what with the complete blackness. If you go, I wish you luck! :P

 

-----

 

Speaking of urban legends, Bigfoot most likely existed, but in a much earlier time period. As for the Loch Ness monster, if it really is a plesiosaur, then it really did exist.

 

In medieval times, people used to find dinosaur footprints and even bones, leading to their findings being used as "proof" for the existence of dragons.


mindeth the cobwebs

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Speaking of that medieval thing, I think I remember reading somewhere that things that looked like Brontosaurus were etched onto some tomb in Europe. I wish I could remember what it was, though.

 

Interesting stuff on dragons.


Hey, I'm Fatorak. I made this account back in November for the Golden Mask contest, but I decided I might as well use it for something more useful. So yeah, I'm gonna be more active on here, or at least TRY to be!

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It's said that Mesopotamians invented a battery in ancient times. I only have one question. What did they need batteries for?

 

To power the spaceships the ancient astronauts gave them, duh.

 

​Speaking of, said batteries are an "OOPart": an out-of-place artifact. Most fringe theorists believe they're evidence of alien contact in human history, or time travel. Other examples are a nail embedded in sandstone discovered in a quarry, and a terracotta head of seemingly Roman origin in a Pre-Columbian burial site in Mexico. Most, however, can be chalked up to hoaxes, terrible attempts at dating the artifacts, or even, in the case of the Abydos "helicopter", pareidolia.

 

​Others are still unexplained, or at least have plausible explanations for their existence, such as the totally awesome Antikythera mechanism.

 

Why would they be interested in space that early?

 

Could those artifacts be planted by somebody? I mean, it's not like aliens and time travelers really do exist, right? Right?

 

-----

 

Speaking of urban legends, Bigfoot most likely existed, but in a much earlier time period. As for the Loch Ness monster, if it really is a plesiosaur, then it really did exist.

 

There are Egyptian pictures showing people using huge light bulbs, so the coined 'Baghdad battery' could have been used for that (it couldn't have been the contemporary name since Baghdad was constructed in late antiquity/early medieval times by the Abbasid Caliphate). If such things did indeed exist as we, modern onlookers, perceive them to be, then it would explain how the deep parts of the Great Pyramids were lavishly worked on when there were little to no air vents. The smoke from torches would have caused suffocation.

 

And people have been fascinated with space since we first fixed our eyes to that Second Heaven back in those ancient times. They mapped the Celestial Curtain or Wall of Stars to tell stories, create prophecies, use them as a map when in a geographic void (middle of the ocean or desert), and map out calendars. Lunar and star-based calendars were used before sun-based ones, and from this usage Egyptian mathematicians constructed a calendar a bit more accurate than our own current Julian/Georgian Calendar. Some of the most ancient civilizations recognized the Second Heaven before it became overshadowed by the First Heaven by means of historical forgeries in the form of mythologies.

 

A useless fact is that I use an old outer space level system in my terminology. First Heaven means the sky where clouds and birds dwell, Second Heaven means the stars, moon and sun and the void where they dwell, and Third Heaven is that where God 'inhabits' outside of our observable universe (phrased as such because no time or space exist there). I don't exactly remember where I got it from, but I think it was from the Apostle Paul of Tarsus.

 

The ape that you referencing as Sasquatch was extremely tall, and so I don't think exactly fits the description of the urban legend. I was once into cryptids and aliens so I am just going off of memory from that phase in my life. The plesiosaur-like pictures stem from one forgery, and another being a dog swimming in fog with a stick. Some people theorize that it could in-fact be some sort of a giant salamander that crossed the Doggerland before it's flooding; and if that was the case, it could tie with the Greek Dragons that were described as fire-breathing giant salamanders.

 

 

 

 

 

In medieval times, people used to find dinosaur footprints and even bones, leading to their findings being used as "proof" for the existence of dragons.

Speaking of that medieval thing, I think I remember reading somewhere that things that looked like Brontosaurus were etched onto some tomb in Europe. I wish I could remember what it was, though.

 

Interesting stuff on dragons.

 

I haven't heard about that, but I've seen what appears to be a brachiosaurus on a Sumerian tomb. Unfortunately, Young Earth Creationists use it as proof that Iraq once had dinosaurs living amongst humans and Nimrod hunted them.

 

Fatorak, in the future, if you are referencing someone could you please click on the 'Quote' button? Makes life easier.

Edited by Iaredios the Hip Historian

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Mark Zuckerberg isn't a big fan of The Social Network. The best thing he's said about it was that "it was interesting", which was what he said when Jesse Eisenberg asked him for his thoughts on the film. He wasn't into how he was portrayed, too. Ouch.

 

People have tried to sue the Monster Energy brand after people died from overconsumption of the energy drink. The drink wasn't proven to be the cause of death in any of the cases.

 

In the Halo franchise, the iconic Master Chief was originally supposed to have a different title. "Master Chief" was a placeholder name during development, but the name stuck.

 

It's Hitler's birthday.

You just HAD to bring that up! :D


mindeth the cobwebs

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In medieval times, people used to find dinosaur footprints and even bones, leading to their findings being used as "proof" for the existence of dragons.

Speaking of that medieval thing, I think I remember reading somewhere that things that looked like Brontosaurus were etched onto some tomb in Europe. I wish I could remember what it was, though.

 

Interesting stuff on dragons.

 

I haven't heard about that, but I've seen what appears to be a brachiosaurus on a Sumerian tomb. Unfortunately, Young Earth Creationists use it as proof that Iraq once had dinosaurs living amongst humans and Nimrod hunted them.

 

Fatorak, in the future, if you are referencing someone could you please click on the 'Quote' button? Makes life easier.

 

​If I recall correctly, you're both thinking of the same thing, and said thing was a hoax.

 

Mark Zuckerberg isn't a big fan of The Social Network. The best thing he's said about it was that "it was interesting", which was what he said when Jesse Eisenberg asked him for his thoughts on the film. He wasn't into how he was portrayed, too. Ouch.

​Thanks for reminding me of one of my favorite Game Grumps videos, and the useless fact that Tom Kenny and Arin "Egoraptor" Hanson once watched a building burn down.

Edited by Pat Lee

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--Samurai Jack was inspired by Frank Miller's cyberpunk comic book limited series Ronin, as well as his graphic novel 300. ​The TMNT were also inspired by Ronin.
 
 --Hilary Mantel's Thomas Cromwell trilogy is the only series to have won the Booker Prize for more than one of its books.
 
 --In certain parts of India, police officers are paid more if they grow a moustache.
 
 --James Joyce called quotation marks:

perverted commas

He preferred the quotation dash (in em-dash form, not en-dash) to preface the dialogue, in European continental style. He got into a fair few arguments with publishers who changed the dash into quotation marks. Basically, this is how it works:
"Hello Patrick", said Larry. "I haven't seen you around for a while".
​"No", said Patrick, "you haven't".
This becomes
—Hello Patrick, said Larry. I haven't seen you around for a while.
—No, said Patrick, you haven't.
It looks great on the page, but can be confusing. Personally, I reckon he should have used it in the Finnish style:
—Hello Patrick, said Larry. —I haven't seen you around for a while.
—No, said Patrick, —you haven't.


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The real name of Sun Tzu, the renown military leader and thinker of the Qin (Chin) Empire, was Sun Wu. His first name is always replaced by 'Tzu' in the West, which means Master (maybe 'teacher'?). Master Sun.

 

it has been theorized that the post-Han Empire kingdom of Wu was named after Sun Wu, as it was the Sun family that forged the kingdom/faux-empire and Sun Wu was known as the greatest known military leader up until that time.

 

Sun Quan (Chuan) was the longest of the first generation of post-Han empire Three Kingdoms rulers to live. His reign was stable and his state being ideologically neutral when compared to the neighbors; that being the realm of Wei being seen as evil and the kingdom of Shu being seen as good.

 

The Battle of Red Cliffs (208 AD) was one of the largest battles in history, and as it was amphibious, it goes under the categories of both land and naval. It was when the warlord-kingdoms of Wu and Shu allied together in order to to fight back the massive invasion of the ruthless Wei warlord-king Cao Cao (Tsao Tsao) in his attempt to unite all of China under his banner and create a new true Chinese empire. It was by sheer strategy and skill that the allies were able to withstand and defeat the overly superior Wei force.

 

Not so much a fact, but I find it interesting that the super powers of far east Eurasia, the Han Empire, and far west Eurasia, the Roman Empire, were both undergoing massive amounts of warfare and destruction in the third century (200's). Only difference is that while the Han Empire was destroyed by such apocalyptic destruction, the Roman Empire was able to heal itself and live on for more than a thousand years.

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--Facial mix-ups of Morgan Freeman and Nelson Mandela have actually occurred in real life.

 

--Classic thriller/noir Night of the Hunter is actually based on a still-in-print book whose fame has been eclipsed by its adaption.

 

--In Cormac McCarthy's novel No Country for Old Men, Sheriff Bell says:

​Here a while back in San Antonio they shot and killed a federal judge.

The novel is set in 1980. In 1979, Judge John Howland Wood was shot by Charles Harrelson, a contract killer. Charles Harrelson was the father of actor Woody Harrelson, who played Carson Wells in the Coen Brothers' film adaptation of No Country for Old Man


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If you form Wales as a Welsh in Crusader Kings II, the game will name it by what the Welsh call their country, Brythoniaid. Strangely, the adjective remains as Welsh, rather than the term Brythonic. Wales is an English name for the mid-west Island-based Brythonics.

 

Despite getting an apology by President Bill Clinton for the actions of American corporations against the Hawaiian people in the years before the USA annexed Hawaii (about a century late), the Hawaiian natives still have not received any native benefits like the North American continental natives in the USA. The government has denied these bonuses as they feel it would cause 'racial division'. What a bunch of hooey.


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In their capital Mexico-Tenochtitlan, the Aztecs had a statue of a god with wide palms pointed upwards, molded like a bowl, supposed to receive the still warm and throbbing hearts of human sacrifices. At one point, in order to receive clarity from gods about the arrival of the 'bearded white men' (which was corresponding with a prophecy about Quetzalcoatl's return), as Maya merchants who first saw the Spanish talked of them, as many as 10000 hearts were loaded on the bowl at once.

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You know why most wealthy people have clothing that fits their form, but normal people can't find anything in the perfect size? It's because they buy clothes that fit the widest parts of their bodies & have tailors alter the clothes so it completely fits their forms. 

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In their capital Mexico-Tenochtitlan, the Aztecs had a statue of a god with wide palms pointed upwards, molded like a bowl, supposed to receive the still warm and throbbing hearts of human sacrifices. At one point, in order to receive clarity from gods about the arrival of the 'bearded white men' (which was corresponding with a prophecy about Quetzalcoatl's return), as Maya merchants who first saw the Spanish talked of them, as many as 10000 hearts were loaded on the bowl at once.

No wonder the Tlaxcallans sided with Spain when it began war with the Aztec Alliance/Empire. Sure got sick and tired of those eternal Flower Wars.

 

 

You know why celebrities have clothing that fits their form, but normal people can't find anything in the perfect size? It's because they buy clothes that fit the widest parts of their bodies & have tailors alter the clothes so it completely fits their forms. 

Don't most wealthy people have tailors?


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--The character S.D. Bob "Snake" Plissken in Escape from New York and Escape from L.A. was originally portrayed as a parody/satire of the '60s action hero -  specifically Clint Eastwood - but grew on to take legendary status of his own (including a number of parodies of him).

​YO DAWG WE HEARD YOU LIKED PARODYS

SO WE PARODIED YOUR PARODY

SO YOU COULD PARODY YOUR PARODY

WHILE PARODYING YOUR PARODY!

 

--John Carpenter has personally scored most of his own films; with the rare exception being his 1982 horror sci-fi classic The Thing (done by the master Ennio Morricone).  


"Mutiny, Booty and Entropy"  - The Three Vices of the Frostelus

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Gonzalo Guerrero was a Spanish explorer in late 15th/early 16th century. While travelling from Cuba to the then unknown Mexico, the ship he was in wrecked and only about twenty of the men on board washed ashore on the Yucatan coast, only to be to caught by local mayans who sacrificed most of them, except Guerrero and Geronimo de Aguilar, a friar, who became slaves for different lords, in different cities. Spaniard returned from time to time, and both captives were asked to aid the mayans in fighting them off, but while Aguilar, later, refused to help them anymore in that matter, Guerrero did, and was so helpful that he earned his freedom, married a mayan woman and had children, and would even become a city governor.

When Hernan Cortes came, and, having heard of at least two Spaniard living among the Maya, sent letters asking for them to join him in his conquest for upper Mexico, the Maya let Aguilar go, and visit Guerrero. But Guerrero refused to go, insisting that he could no longer be accepted among Spaniards, that he had a family to take care of, and showing pride for his children.

After Cortes conquered the Aztecs in the north, and returned south for the Maya, Guerrero led his mayan men to victory countless times, but in the end he and his city, and his allies, succumbed to the sheer superiority of the Spanish army. He was presumably shot in the head by an arrow.

 

I just find his story to be so much fascinating. He fought against his own people, he betrayed them, in a way, to defend a tribe he did not belong to, that accepted and loved him nevertheless. Is he to blame for what he has done? Was it worth anything in the end?

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The city of Phoenix is built atop the ruins of the hohokham civilization, the canals especially. It was only later that some of the foundations were preserved for archaeological reasons.


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The city of Phoenix is built atop the ruins of the hohokham civilization, the canals especially. It was only later that some of the foundations were preserved for archaeological reasons.

Pre-Colombian civilizations are coo'. Where is it again that they have the giant "mounds" that are actually temples?

 

Also I'm pretty sure that means Phoenix is cursed, according to many horror stories.


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