Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Welcome to BZPower!

Hi there, while we hope you enjoy browsing through the site, there's a lot more you can do if you register. Some perks of joining include:
  • Create your own topics, participate in existing discussions, and vote in polls
  • Show off your creations, stories, art, music, and movies
  • Enter contests to win free LEGO sets and other prizes
  • Participate in raffles to win LEGO prizes
  • Organize with other members to attend or send your MOCs to LEGO fan events all over the world
  • Much, much more!
Enjoy your visit!


Photo

"Disk Duel" Bionicle Microfilm

Bionicle Stop-motion Kanoka Film

  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Online ToaKumo

ToaKumo
  • Members
  • Turaga

  • 08-May 17
  • 76 posts

Posted Jul 16 2017 - 08:32 AM

This is my first Bionicle film; two Matoran partake in the illegal sport of disk dueling, it is only short and mainly just serves as an introduction for me into animating Bionicle figures, please leave whatever constuctive feedback you like  ;)

 


  • 2

My Youtube channel: https://www.youtube....KmVtcnoJTv7g6PA , Bionicle films coming soon!


#2 Offline Inary the Gunhaver

Inary the Gunhaver
  • Members
  • Mask of Time Discovered

  • 29-May 15
  • 4,004 posts
  •  

Posted Jul 16 2017 - 09:20 PM

Ah, to see the work of an animator in his early days. Reminds me of the time when I still made basic stop motions...  Not that I feel like I'm out of those times, though...

 

All I can say is keep practicing. That's the only way you can get better at animation. Have patience with both your film and yourself, have fun with it, try out new ideas, and you should be fine. On the technical aspect, such as frames per second that you want, I can't help you. I'm still trying to find an FPS that feels right and I can work with well. 

 

I AM a little confused as to what went on during this microfilm. Like, why did the white Matoran fall onto a support bar? I don't know how much space you gave yourself to work with, but working with Bionicle figures does tend to make animations feel a little cramped unless you're good with cinematography.  


  • 0

rubbersoul-win.gifx8_team_by_mizz_ninja.gifbnWaS7N.gif

:smileonuanu:  :smilepohatunu:  :smiletahunu:  :smiletol:  :smilekopakanu:  :smilelewanu:  :smilegalinu:  

 

                                                                                                                                                                       


#3 Online ToaKumo

ToaKumo
  • Members
  • Turaga

  • 08-May 17
  • 76 posts

Posted Jul 17 2017 - 04:44 AM

Ah, to see the work of an animator in his early days. Reminds me of the time when I still made basic stop motions...  Not that I feel like I'm out of those times, though...

 

All I can say is keep practicing. That's the only way you can get better at animation. Have patience with both your film and yourself, have fun with it, try out new ideas, and you should be fine. On the technical aspect, such as frames per second that you want, I can't help you. I'm still trying to find an FPS that feels right and I can work with well. 

 

I AM a little confused as to what went on during this microfilm. Like, why did the white Matoran fall onto a support bar? I don't know how much space you gave yourself to work with, but working with Bionicle figures does tend to make animations feel a little cramped unless you're good with cinematography.  

Thanks for the feedback, I wish the film could have explained it better, the white matoran was hit with a teleport kanoka and the green/brown one was hit with a freeze, I learned a lot with this project, and I will certainly keep practicing!


  • 0

My Youtube channel: https://www.youtube....KmVtcnoJTv7g6PA , Bionicle films coming soon!


#4 Offline ToaBion

ToaBion
  • Members
  • Inhabitant

  • 04-September 15
  • 7 posts
  •  

Posted Jul 18 2017 - 11:24 AM

Hey ToaKumo:

 

I have made a few stop-motion clips and what I can recomend you is to have from 10 to 25 frames per second (more frames per second equals neater scenes). I also recomend you to have a remot controler to the camera so the camera is always still and the scene doesn't shake.

 

But the most important of all: practice a lot  :)

 

Hope it helps you.


  • 0

#5 Offline Azani

Azani
  • Members
  • Aquatic Guardian

  • 16-November 13
  • 389 posts
  •  

Posted Jul 20 2017 - 04:21 AM

There's a legitimate level of polish to this animation, and I appreciate it quite a bit, particularly in light of the number of animators working with constraction LEGO nowadays. As the others have said, the camera stability and angles are crucial variables to get down; additionally, your work may benefit from greater variation in the style of shots, including some wider and closer shots at appropriate times. You might want to consider a chromakey-inserted background as well; just a couple of thoughts.

Nice job on the finished product; you just earned yourself another subscriber.

  • 0

Find (digital) me under the name Azani on YouTube, Eurobricks, Discord, the BioMedia Project and the TTV Message Boards.
 
Please check out Project AFTERMAN on Tumblr and Facebook; I'm proud to have worked as their PR Manager and as a writer.

 
AAZZ.jpg


#6 Online ToaKumo

ToaKumo
  • Members
  • Turaga

  • 08-May 17
  • 76 posts

Posted Jul 20 2017 - 01:24 PM

Hey ToaKumo:

 

I have made a few stop-motion clips and what I can recomend you is to have from 10 to 25 frames per second (more frames per second equals neater scenes). I also recomend you to have a remot controler to the camera so the camera is always still and the scene doesn't shake.

 

But the most important of all: practice a lot  :)

 

Hope it helps you.

Thanks for the tips, my camera is actually remote controlled, I just kept knocking it when moving the figures  ^_^ I will keep practicing!

There's a legitimate level of polish to this animation, and I appreciate it quite a bit, particularly in light of the number of animators working with constraction LEGO nowadays. As the others have said, the camera stability and angles are crucial variables to get down; additionally, your work may benefit from greater variation in the style of shots, including some wider and closer shots at appropriate times. You might want to consider a chromakey-inserted background as well; just a couple of thoughts.

Nice job on the finished product; you just earned yourself another subscriber.

Next time I make a Bionicle film I will certainly try, I've got a green screen and a pink screen to experiment with! I'll certainly experiment with more camera angles! Thanks for the subscribe  :)


  • 1

My Youtube channel: https://www.youtube....KmVtcnoJTv7g6PA , Bionicle films coming soon!





0 user(s) are browsing this forum

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users