Jump to content

Recommended Posts

36595571255_f9ed653e36_z.jpg36595571195_122c030f52_z.jpg
36595571065_a903cc9794_z.jpg


PAIGE (Prototype Artificial Intelligence, Gynoid Expression) was created by robotics student Letta Arkwright to simulate the kinds of social competencies she struggled with in her own day-to-day life. PAIGE is powered by a digital brain with an unprecedented social learning engine. As PAIGE teaches her creator to relate to others and to understand her own emotional needs, she is also learning for herself what it means to be a person.

This model of PAIGE uses over 830 pieces, stands 18.1 inches/46 centimeters/57.5 modules tall, weighs about 24 ounces/672 grams, and has 36 points of articulation. Her mouth, eyes, and eyebrows can be adjusted and/or swapped out to display different emotions.
  • Upvote 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very glossy. Nice use of bubble cockpits to transition from waist to hips, fills the area well without losing the smoothness of the build. Similarly, the presence of the ballshaft in the toes is beautiful - this is the first time I've seen them used in a MOC.

 

How did you manage to make the thighs stay together? I hardly try to use those large cockpits because I find their connection points too loose... are the square cutout ones (as I can see are used here) more secure than the slit cutout versions?

Also, why go with light grey on the chest, versus dark grey elsewhere?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very glossy. Nice use of bubble cockpits to transition from waist to hips, fills the area well without losing the smoothness of the build. Similarly, the presence of the ballshaft in the toes is beautiful - this is the first time I've seen them used in a MOC.

 

How did you manage to make the thighs stay together? I hardly try to use those large cockpits because I find their connection points too loose... are the square cutout ones (as I can see are used here) more secure than the slit cutout versions?

Also, why go with light grey on the chest, versus dark grey elsewhere?

Yeah, this thigh construction definitely wouldn't have worked with the version of this cockpit that has the smaller cutout. The square cutout has two anti-studs in the center, which I've attached to either side of the leg joints using these brackets. There'd be no "legal" way to attach the cockpit pieces by the anti-studs on the sides without altering the proportions of the legs. But attached this way it's pretty secure.

 

The Medium Stone Grey on the chest is mainly because I didn't have the 1x3 slopes in Dark Stone Grey on hand and forgot to order any, so had to borrow some lighter ones from the Dragon's Forge. Also, I'm using the same Medium Stone Grey 1x2 brackets in the center there as on the bottoms of the feet, which are primarily that color due to the Mixel joints for the toes. I might still go back and change the color of those slopes and brackets in the chest at some point.

 

Thanks so much for the feedback!

Edited by Aanchir

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a very smooth model, I like the glass head and robot brain. It feels very humanoid in shape. I like the robotic looking knee joints, well done!

 

Thank you so much!

 

If anybody's curious about details of the build, I just uploaded an LDD model of PAIGE. Some of the interior "filler" parts may vary from the physical model, and each of the revolver pieces on the fingertips should be replaced with this piece which is not available in LDD, but otherwise it should give you a good overview of her design.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This model is really good...Thicc with the keetorage and whatnot....but I am concerned with your close attention to detail, however....

Thank you! At this scale, I figured anything short of close attention to detail would be a missed opportunity. Most of the model was planned out on LEGO Digital Designer so I had plenty of opportunity to figure out how to construct the more detailed parts like the head and feet. That said, I also tried to try and maintain a certain economy of detail by keeping most of the model solid, smooth, and proportionate, instead of having a lot of exaggerated shapes or distracting textures. It was a real challenge to figure out how exactly the upper body should fit together to create a lifelike shape, and the end result involves studs pointed in basically every direction. I hope I was successful!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...