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I finished To Kill a Mockingbird a little while ago. When I first began reading it for class I assumed that it wouldn't be very interesting, but it turned out to be an extremely enthralling read. Next up: John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and Lopez Lomong's Running for My Life, all for summer reading.


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Finished A Dance with Dragons. Sure was fun.

 

And by fun I mean I watched all my favourite characters die.

Edited by The Shouting God

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With the clamor of anvils and the thunder of guns, we rip each day from life's teeth.

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Re-read Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory Maguire. I don't know anything about Oz beyond the most famous MGM movie version, and I haven't read any of Baum's books. But I love how Maguire completely deconstructs Oz and turns it into something else entirely. He really makes the world believable, and his take on the witch is fascinating. I'm in the process of reading the sequel right now, and while it doesn't seem to be starting off as strong, I'm sure it will still be an interesting read at worst.


BZPRPG

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Just finished reading The Prestige, by Christopher Priest, yesterday. I then re-watched the film last night. =P Both really are amazing works of art, and I'm having trouble deciding which I preferred. Both were fantastic, and ultimately the same, yet very different at the same time. Either way, the book is fantastic and definitely recommended. The writing structure was really enjoyable.

 

Since my last post I've also read...wow, I haven't posted in a while:

  • The Night Circus, by Erin Morgenstern, which is one of my favorite novels ever. Also about magicians, but far different from The Prestige. It's really an amazing book, though. Experiencing this book seemed to be like experiencing the circus itself--reading all of the descriptions, the clever details; everything was very well-written. A fantastic story with an extremely enjoyable setting, characters, etc. I only wish it wasn't over (at the same time being extremely satisfied--as much as I almost wish it was a series, it's perfect as a standalone), and eagerly await Erin Morgenstern's next book. Highly recommended.
  • Jurassic Park, by Michael Crichton. Quite a fun book. I need to re-watch the movie sometime.
  • Human Chain, by Seamus Heaney. Perhaps my favorite poet after Edgar Allen Poe, Heaney really is amazing.
  • The Raven Boys, by Maggie Stiefvater. One of my friends at school made me read this, and it was pretty good.
  • The Walking Dead: Rise of the Governor, by Robert Krikman and Jay Bonansinga. Wasn't a huge fan of the present tense, but I really enjoyed the story--good addition and background to the Walking Dead universe.
  • The Aylesford Skull, by James P. Blaylock. The first Steampunk novel I have read by one of the grandfathers of Steampunk, this was really enjoyable. I also just love the Victorian era.
  • A Study in Scarlet, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Great first Sherlock Holmes novelette. It got a little long during the first part of the second half, but I have to commend Doyle for how much depth he put into the character, even if not necessarily all of it needed to be in the story. I also loved seeing the relationship between this story and "A Study in Pink" from the TV show Sherlock.
  • The Sign of Four, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. I really liked the old TV movie version of this with Jeremy Brett, and reading it was fun.
  • Little Brother, by Cory Doctorow. Not really my favorite book. but it wasn't bad.
  • Devils in Exile, by Chuck Hogan. I think I preferred The Town/Prince of Thieves, but this was an enjoyable book as well.

Edited by Velox

"As a writer you ask yourself to dream while awake." ~ Aimee Bender

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Scorpia Rising.

 

RIP Jack.


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P̴̡͘r̛̕a̵͟i̷͞s͢͠é̴̢̛̕ ̛͡t̴̶̨͞h͢҉̶e̢͟ ̸̢͢͠R͢é̷͏̶d̸͘͞ ̴͟͡͏͞a͞n̶̛̕̕҉d̶͠͞͞ ̶̡̧B̷̛l̀҉a҉̢́͟c̕͠k̢͠ ̶̸̡͟͢Ģ͞͝͏͝ó̕d̛͢͢͡͠.̧҉.̷̧̛͟͞.̀҉̴
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Minecraft username: furno5943

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Finished Of Mice and Men (Steinbeck) and Running for my Life (Lomong). The former is brilliantly done; it delivers a powerful, engaging story full of fascinating, believable characters in just over a hundred pages. The latter is certainly worth a read as well.

 

Next up: Huckleberry Finn.


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"Batman The Killing Joke" by Alan Moore I think it's a good book though I don't know why Alan Moore says otherwise. "Arkham Asylum: A serious house on a serious earth" by Grant Morrison there was so much symbolism I had to look at the script notes just to see what he was talking about still enjoyable though the symbolism is very easy to miss. "The Honorable Schoolboy" by John le Carre I think my one problem is that I always feel I missed something but I just got to the second chapter so that might change and it is somewhat intriguing.

Edited by The Scanty Panty

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My most recent read was Neil Gaiman's The Ocean at the End of the Lane. It was really good, and really exemplifies that type of horror in childhood that comes from a sense of powerlessness and bewilderment.


Formerly Lyichir: Rachira of Influence

Aanchir's and Meiko's brother

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Finished Orson Scott Card's Earth Unaware on the plane yesterday, and I'm just finishing up World War Z.

 

The latter is good (haven't seen the movie, but I hear that's mostly irrelevant to the book plot), but it's losing a lot of steam at the end. Glad my roommate happened to have a copy, anyway. The Ender book was great, though could easily have not been the start of a trilogy, and just been a whole story.

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1984. Interesting fact, the graphics of obey shirts came from the film adaption of 1984.


 
 
                                             
 
                                
 
 
                                                                                    

2147465

 

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Finished The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. It was assigned for summer reading, but that didn't stop it from being one of the greatest books I've ever read. Now if only I didn't have to go back and write a bunch of journal entries about it...

 

I'll probably read A Monster Calls or A Game of Thrones next.


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Since my last post I've read the full trilogy of the Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien, as well as American Gods, by Neil Gaiman. Not that it wasn't already a known fact, but these books really do just prove the genius of Tolkien. And definitely better than the movies, too (which is saying a lot, as the movies are some of my all-time favorites--I re-watched the extended trilogy after finishing the books)--the best examples of that are the Ents, the confrontation of Gandalf and the Witch King, and the Scouring of the Shire. For the former, those were actually some of my favorite chapters of the whole trilogy, whereas in the movie those scenes were probably some of my least favorite. As for Gandalf/Witch King, that was most likely the greatest scene in the entire trilogy. The last couple pages of "The Siege of Gondor" were simply amazing and super cool and awesome. In the movies, it gets an extremely short scene exclusive to the extended edition. I never thought that scene was bad, but after having read the original in the book...yeah, Jackson kind of failed that one. And the "Scouring of the Shire" chapter was a really awesome addition in the book.

 

Oh, and I also kind of hate the ending of LOTR. =P Not by any fault of Tolkien (or Jackson, for the movies), but simply because of that nostalgic, "what now" feeling. And I just hate that feeling. It's really very realistic, though--what would you do after that? How can you go back to just a normal life? Tolkien did an amazing job with it (and I think it was better because there was the Scouring of the Shire), but I think Jackson did it fairly well, too--the bar scene, specifically, and how they're just kind of there, separate from everyone else. Anyway, just a very realistic ending but not quite my favorite feeling. =P All in all, amazing books and the movies are great adaptations.

 

American Gods was also really good--I've been a big fan of Mythology since taking Latin during high school (where we also studied some Greek/Roman Mythology), and all those elements in the book made it really enjoyable.

Edited by Velox

"As a writer you ask yourself to dream while awake." ~ Aimee Bender

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The last book I read was Nada by Laforet, for school. It makes a really interesting picture of postwar Barcelona, a hopless, broken, gray world which translates in broken, hopless and miserable characters. Right now I'm also reading The Short Timers by G. Hasford. So far, I'm enjoying how the brutality of war is protrayed, and the effect that it has on the soldiers.


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Finished Amnesia Moon by Jonathan Lethem. Considering Gun, With Occasional Music is one of my favourite books, it took me a while to check his other work out, but I'm glad I finally did.

A very engaging and intriguing book, with the right amount of humour and a great post-apocalyptic setting and characters. Loved how you can never be quite sure what exactly is real or who's telling the truth, and whether you can actually trust the protagonist's memories.


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X:15 - An Ambage Anthology. There's a lot of really good stories in there. Certain bits aren't quite as polished as others, but it's definitely worth a read.

 

constellations is better


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Moving pictures, by Terry Pratchett. I'm trying to read all of the discworld books, I'm about half way through :D It was very good. I also just started The return of the king, for the second time, by J.R.R tolkein.

Edited by Radagast367

If you think that godzilla is NOT awesome, you're either crazy,


or one of the many people who got trodden on while he was saving the world.



92% of teens have moved onto rap.


If you are part of the 8% that still listen to real music, copy and paste this into your signature


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The Graveyard Book, Neil Gaiman. Not for the kids, despite it's premise(A young boy lives in a graveyard, raised by ghosts). A brilliant novel, with loads upon loads on meticulous detail.


Morally unambiguous.

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