Jump to content

LEGO Simpsons


Recommended Posts

I don't have a problem with this in itself (I won't be buying any and I don't like the Simpsons, but if LEGO thinks it will work who am I to say anything against it?) What I really have a problem with is how they'll do this, but have turned down other more adult focused themes in the past..

"Not luck. It's what you do that makes you a hero." -Toa Kopaka

Link to comment
Share on other sites

lego has original and licensed themes that include guns and swords and other weapons and feature storylines that involve people violently harming and sometimes killing each other and we say that's totally appropriate for childrenlego considers making a set that features a beer and we say that is inappropriate for children

Edited by Princess Grr
bring back "an cool dude"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

lego has original and licensed themes that include guns and swords and other weapons and feature storylines that involve people violently harming and sometimes killing each other and we say that's totally appropriate for childrenlego considers making a set that features a beer and we say that is inappropriate for children

I think many of the people criticizing LEGO Simpsons for that also criticize other licensed themes for the violence. By far not everyone is fond of LEGO making LoTR sets, or even Star Wars (though those seem to be more accepted).-Gata signoff.png

- Gata

signoffLarge.png

 

Please don't use my avatar or signature without permission, thanks! ^_^

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

i'm gonna have to echo a few other voices and say i don't see how Lego can support the Simpson's brand while turning down Firefly for adult content. To be honest, it's a bit like turning down Jurassic Park sets for the gore in the movies and then approving a line based on the Saw movies.

Jurassic Park is the wrong generation, as is firefly. I don't know anyone under teen age that watches it. Heck, I don't know many people that watch it at all.

 

Back to the Future is a whole generation older than Firefly, and also contained adult material, and got a set made for it. Firefly definitely has a large, supporting fanbase or it wouldn't have gotten through CUUSOO at all.

The question is not "who watches it?" the question is "where is LEGO drawing the line on adult material?" because that was their stated reason for rejecting Firefly, and which this theme contradicts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Y'see, the thing about Firefly versus The Simpsons is that The Simpsons is far and away a more popular (and thus more lucrative) line. So is Back to the Future - Marty McFly and Doc Brown are as much a part of pop culture as Homer or Bart Simpson are. Firefly has a committed fan base, but it's not a big enough fan base to make the sets worth producing. Browncoats are probably some of the most loyal fans of any series, but loyalty does you nothing if you haven't made a substantial enough cultural impact to be made well-known.

avatar by Lady Kopaka


tumblr_ng1pw4xLEM1tryxewo1_1280.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

i'm gonna have to echo a few other voices and say i don't see how Lego can support the Simpson's brand while turning down Firefly for adult content. To be honest, it's a bit like turning down Jurassic Park sets for the gore in the movies and then approving a line based on the Saw movies.

Jurassic Park is the wrong generation, as is firefly. I don't know anyone under teen age that watches it. Heck, I don't know many people that watch it at all.

 

Back to the Future is a whole generation older than Firefly, and also contained adult material, and got a set made for it. Firefly definitely has a large, supporting fanbase or it wouldn't have gotten through CUUSOO at all.

The question is not "who watches it?" the question is "where is LEGO drawing the line on adult material?" because that was their stated reason for rejecting Firefly, and which this theme contradicts.

 

Doesn't firefly have graphic violence? I think I saw part of an episode where some guy got a pretty nasty shot in the chest or something.

 

I don't recall much violence in BTTF, but it's been a while.

animated_icon_by_modaltmasks-d6shs5w.gifmodalt_banner.png 76561198054169989.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Personally I am disappointed in Legos new gearing towards younger audiences. To me, Lego simpsons is just a new link in the chain of Legos new marketing theme.

 

So you mean their main demographic? A company or business exists to make profit. If they believe this move will be profitable, they'll do it.

AΨ 94

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

 

i'm gonna have to echo a few other voices and say i don't see how Lego can support the Simpson's brand while turning down Firefly for adult content. To be honest, it's a bit like turning down Jurassic Park sets for the gore in the movies and then approving a line based on the Saw movies.

Jurassic Park is the wrong generation, as is firefly. I don't know anyone under teen age that watches it. Heck, I don't know many people that watch it at all.

 

Back to the Future is a whole generation older than Firefly, and also contained adult material, and got a set made for it. Firefly definitely has a large, supporting fanbase or it wouldn't have gotten through CUUSOO at all.

The question is not "who watches it?" the question is "where is LEGO drawing the line on adult material?" because that was their stated reason for rejecting Firefly, and which this theme contradicts.

 

Doesn't firefly have graphic violence? I think I saw part of an episode where some guy got a pretty nasty shot in the chest or something.

 

I don't recall much violence in BTTF, but it's been a while.

 

If we're talking Graphic Violence, the Simpsons had an episode where homer has his thumb cut off graphically in the beginning, and episode where someone walks into a hospital bleeding heavily from the gut, and then there's Itchy and Scratchy....

 

I don't remember about BTTF, but Indiana Jones sure did, and it got a whole licensed line.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If we're talking Graphic Violence, the Simpsons had an episode where homer has his thumb cut off graphically in the beginning, and episode where someone walks into a hospital bleeding heavily from the gut, and then there's Itchy and Scratchy....

 

 

 

 

I don't remember about BTTF, but Indiana Jones sure did, and it got a whole licensed line.

 

Well the simpsons don't look like real people. I'm not really grossed out when scratchy gets his guts ripped out, but if there's some horror movie where they make it look real, heck, I'm not going to that movie.

 

The bottom line is, if you have a kid that buys a set for a violent movie, and then goes to see said violent movie, that's not lego's fault. It's called bad parenting.

Edited by Steve the Squid

animated_icon_by_modaltmasks-d6shs5w.gifmodalt_banner.png 76561198054169989.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to echo the sentiments of many, why now?

Maybe they only just had the idea.

 

If you think about it, it makes sense to make Lego Simpsons, whether they're at the peak of their popularity or not.

 

And Lego doesn't seem to care about their lines being popular; Lone Ranger did terrible (Though the movie was fantastic, best movie of the year IMO), and many other themes they had were based off stuff that was more or less unpopular.

 

You could bring up the same argument with Spongebob. The show certainly wasn't in its prime when sets came out for it.

Edited by Steve the Squid

animated_icon_by_modaltmasks-d6shs5w.gifmodalt_banner.png 76561198054169989.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

i'm gonna have to echo a few other voices and say i don't see how Lego can support the Simpson's brand while turning down Firefly for adult content. To be honest, it's a bit like turning down Jurassic Park sets for the gore in the movies and then approving a line based on the Saw movies.

Jurassic Park is the wrong generation, as is firefly. I don't know anyone under teen age that watches it. Heck, I don't know many people that watch it at all.

 

 

Take that back. Jurassic Park is perfect, for every generation.

rawrrrr2.png

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm just going to use the words of others to give you my thoughts:

I must agree with the more cynical voices here.

I guess this is interesting, but I don't really see the logic.

Well, that's a pretty late April fool's joke from LEGO.

save not only their lives


d665fa5c17bc200a946e0a69eaf11f929dc080cb


but their spirits

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I have to echo the sentiments of many, why now?

Maybe they only just had the idea.

 

If you think about it, it makes sense to make Lego Simpsons, whether they're at the peak of their popularity or not.

 

And Lego doesn't seem to care about their lines being popular; Lone Ranger did terrible (Though the movie was fantastic, best movie of the year IMO), and many other themes they had were based off stuff that was more or less unpopular.

 

You could bring up the same argument with Spongebob. The show certainly wasn't in its prime when sets came out for it.

 

 

The 30% rating for that movie seems to disagree with you.

AΨ 94

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

I have to echo the sentiments of many, why now?

Maybe they only just had the idea.

 

If you think about it, it makes sense to make Lego Simpsons, whether they're at the peak of their popularity or not.

 

And Lego doesn't seem to care about their lines being popular; Lone Ranger did terrible (Though the movie was fantastic, best movie of the year IMO), and many other themes they had were based off stuff that was more or less unpopular.

 

You could bring up the same argument with Spongebob. The show certainly wasn't in its prime when sets came out for it.

 

 

The 30% rating for that movie seems to disagree with you.

 

 

In any case, I'm not thinking about how "popular" The Simpsons is.

I just really don't get why they are making LEGO sets of an adult animation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 30% rating for that movie seems to disagree with you.

You know what? I will NEVER again in my life accept the ratings for a movie ever again, after the Lone Ranger. When I left the theater, I could hear all the other groups chattering to themselves about how good the movie is and wondering why it got bad reviews. Why should I listen to a bunch of strangers who don't share my taste in movies in the first place? What makes them qualified to judge the movie over me? I call Please don't bypass the filter. -B6 on all of it.

Take that back. Jurassic Park is perfect, for every generation.

I didn't say it wasn't a good movie, or that kids of this generation wouldn't like it. But I can tell you that 99% of kids under the age of 12 haven't seen Jurassic Park. I didn't even end up watching it until about a year ago. It's a great movie, but it's too old to be pop culture for Lego's target audience. Edited by Black Six

animated_icon_by_modaltmasks-d6shs5w.gifmodalt_banner.png 76561198054169989.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

In any case, I'm not thinking about how "popular" The Simpsons is.

I just really don't get why they are making LEGO sets of an adult animation.

 

 

It's not really an "adult" animation. My family used to watch it all the time together when I was like... seven or eight and, in retrospect, there really isn't a whole lot in there that's explicitly inappropriate (if you want that, go see South Park or Family Guy). Honestly, I can't think of much from that series that's worse than... say, some of the stuff in Bionicle (moreso the 2006 on era, where the story got a whole lot... well, darker). Like Bionicle just lacks alcohol, but it had plenty of violence. It also lacked language, but The Simpsons hasn't really had any worse language than any of the other licensed themes (and nothing I didn't hear my parents say whenever they stubbed their toe).

 

A bit cruder than King of the Hill, but like... not by as much of a margin as some shows lumped in the same category (ie: Family Guy).

 

Dunno why they want to make sets now, the show's not really in its prime anymore (albeit I still watch it sometimes, 'cuz why not), but I'm actually kinda curious to see what is produced.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

But I can tell you that 99% of kids under the age of 12 haven't seen Jurassic Park.

Alright, bring in the "I AM THE 1%" memes

 

 

Holy, I loved Jurassic Park movies when I was 4. XD

 

And I'm of this generation.

 

So I guess it's 2% now. :P

 

 

Also, LEGO DID do a few Jurassic Park sets. As a part of the studio line. Pretty lame, but still.

 

The Simpsons isn't too much different from other licensed themes. The Spider-Man 1 and 2 sets, Lord of The Ringws, Indiana Jones, Star Wars...

-G u u R a h K

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

 

In any case, I'm not thinking about how "popular" The Simpsons is.

I just really don't get why they are making LEGO sets of an adult animation.

 

 

It's not really an "adult" animation. My family used to watch it all the time together when I was like... seven or eight and, in retrospect, there really isn't a whole lot in there that's explicitly inappropriate (if you want that, go see South Park or Family Guy). Honestly, I can't think of much from that series that's worse than... say, some of the stuff in Bionicle (moreso the 2006 on era, where the story got a whole lot... well, darker). Like Bionicle just lacks alcohol, but it had plenty of violence. It also lacked language, but The Simpsons hasn't really had any worse language than any of the other licensed themes (and nothing I didn't hear my parents say whenever they stubbed their toe).

 

A bit cruder than King of the Hill, but like... not by as much of a margin as some shows lumped in the same category (ie: Family Guy).

 

Dunno why they want to make sets now, the show's not really in its prime anymore (albeit I still watch it sometimes, 'cuz why not), but I'm actually kinda curious to see what is produced.

 

 

I know. But I wouldn't really call it a kid's show.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, LEGO DID do a few Jurassic Park sets. As a part of the studio line. Pretty lame, but still.

Oh yeah, forgot those were Spielberg sets!

 

I know. But I wouldn't really call it a kid's show.

Name the last set line based on a movie that was a "kid's movie".

 

Star wars episode 3: THAT'S violence. Go complain about that.

animated_icon_by_modaltmasks-d6shs5w.gifmodalt_banner.png 76561198054169989.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I guess we will see how it turns out once we actually see the sets.

Exactly. People need to quit assuming that Lego is not going to have filters here, and just see what happens. THEN we can revolt.

 

 

I take "revolt" means "not buying the sets"?

 

Anyway, not sure that this was a good business move.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What makes me wonder about The Simpsons is if the line may not be so popular in other countries, due to both the satire on American culture present throughout and the various questionable cultural and racial stereotypes.

Thank you, BZPower staff. In the past, I wish I showed more appreciation for all that you do. From one Bionicle fan to another, thank you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

i'm gonna have to echo a few other voices and say i don't see how Lego can support the Simpson's brand while turning down Firefly for adult content. To be honest, it's a bit like turning down Jurassic Park sets for the gore in the movies and then approving a line based on the Saw movies.

I haven't seen Firefly and know very little about it, but my guess is that Lego really turned it down because it wasn't as marketable to a younger demographic. In that regard Simpsons would be a safer decision.

 

Firefly sets were turned down for one reason and one reason alone:Inara.

31399314352_5890b9b8a3_o.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Hmm...Simpsons...yeah, if LEGO is going to be doing a Simpsons line, I'd really like to see them reconsider the Firefly CUUSOO project.

 

Dude yessss. That would be amazing. As for the Simpsons, I was never really a fan of the show, so I don't care much about the sets.

 

 

 

I haven't seen Firefly and know very little about it, but my guess is that Lego really turned it down because it wasn't as marketable to a younger demographic. In that regard Simpsons would be a safer decision.

 

 

i'm gonna have to echo a few other voices and say i don't see how Lego can support the Simpson's brand while turning down Firefly for adult content. To be honest, it's a bit like turning down Jurassic Park sets for the gore in the movies and then approving a line based on the Saw movies.

 

As DeeVee said, the Firefly CUUSOO project will never happen because of Inara and that fact that she is a prostitute.

 

I don't watch the simpsons, so I won't buy any of the sets. The cartoon just never... impressed me. In my opinon, it was just a bunch of lame jokes strung together without any real reason.I just can't help but think of the Spongebob (which I don't watch either) sets. I don't think anyone really buys them anymore, but LEGO's probably stuck with the licensing stuff for another few years so they have to keep making sets, even if no one buys them. I'm worried this will happen here.Why can't Lego do any cool licenses, like the Legend of Zelda? (Seriously, there have been 2 or 3 CUSCOO projects already.)Or even better, an original line! That's not City or a Kingdoms repeat! GASP!

 

Because in order to do "cool licenses", they have to either appeal to the company who owns that license (if it works with their future plans and goals for the LEGO company and they have the financial means for it), or have that company come to them wanting to create LEGO sets for them of their product(s). And, K'nex already has at least part of the license with Nintendo when it comes to construction toys, so Nintendo is pretty locked in for the time being.

 

And for original lines...Ninjago, Chima, Friends, Galaxy Quest, Technic, Architecture, Modular Buildings, Bionicle, Monster Fighters. Clearly, we're running out of originial lines here.

 

I wish they'd let the Simpsons die gracefully already...

Nah, it's made by a guy from Portland, Oregon. If anything, it's going down in a flaming, glitter death while twerking.

Edited by Nukaya
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Firefly sets were turned down for one reason and one reason alone:Inara.

 

 

It was actually kind of funny at the time to watch the Cuusoo people be all supportive of the project and then go and actually watch Firefly and go "Whoa, I dunno if this is gonna work." (It was an awesome model for an awesome series, but alas it wasn't meant to be.)

 

Eh, my post here earlier got eaten, but I'll just say that, while I like the Simpsons a lot, it doesn't seem like that great of a fit for Lego. But then again, I said that for LotR, and look how that turned out? At the very least, it's an interesting move on their part and I'll be eager to see how this license theme turns out. (And if it does, I would totes be in support of Futurama sets next. :P )

 

:music:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I was part of that 2001-2004 generation where there was a huge boom of creativity on the company's part with how they managed their own IPs, so to see LEGO make Simpsons sets is... disappointing, the say the least.

 

[sarcasm] 'Cause, you know, let's take this really effective educational toy and license one of the most unintelligent TV series with it. We already got Jersey Shore and Honey Boo Boo sets lined up for this summer, so why not? [/sarcasm]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would say I'm looking forward to it despite what others say. After all, people who think Lego should stick to the child-friendly only image really don't understand much when it comes to demographics. Besides, the Simpsons (while yes, the quality is a little lower due to different writers and less show time because of adverts and of course less good jokes because the FOX censors won't allow it) is and was a very popular franchise with plenty of things you could Lego-ify. I think they could probably get away with a Moe's Tavern if they just make a few alterations here and there. And come on, who wouldn't want to have their own Lego Frink? I think another thing that intrigues me is that this will be the first time in about ten years or so that a licensed theme would be using Yellow as the skin colour again. I hated that change, I want my yellow harry potters back!

Current (still-living) BZRPG Characters:
LITOZEN (Toa of Sonics) SANCHII (Toa of Air)
THENTYLE (Toa of Earth) MALKAN (Ta-Matoran)

CELITE (Turaga of Lightning)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

What lego should be doing for Licensed sets like this is put them into the Minifigure Packs instead of making WHOLE sets for them. Imagine, mini figure packs for: Simpsons, Spongebob (which would have be better instead of FULL sets, let people make their own sets and just provide the figures), and possible other Licenses from movies and TV. Those things would also become collector's items!

They can't do that. By a technicality that's unfortunate for the fans, a minifigure pack counts as action figures, a license Lego usually does not buy. That's why the Star Wars magnet sets started being glued, although I don't know why Lego decided to start gluing all of the magnets. So no minifig packs in the future. And why would the cheaper, more common minfigs become collector's items? It's the minifigs from promos and large, old, licensed sets that become collectible.

 

Well, that all depends. The reason LEGO can't do Star Wars action figures isn't the fact that they haven't sought out an action figure license, but that they can't get one. Hasbro has had an exclusive license to produce Star Wars action figures ever since they acquired Kenner, which itself had an exclusive license to produce Star Wars action figures. That means that even if Lucasfilms/Disney wanted to let LEGO produce Star Wars minifigure packs, they couldn't do so without breaking their extremely lucrative license agreement with Hasbro.Note that LEGO has produced minifigure packs for some other licensed themes, such as Pirates of the Caribbean.

Personally I am disappointed in Legos new gearing towards younger audiences. To me, Lego simpsons is just a new link in the chain of Legos new marketing theme.

LEGO has always been geared towards younger audiences. That's just reality. I'm assuming that you're thinking about BIONICLE when you're thinking of some hypothetical time when LEGO was targeted at older audiences, but BIONICLE sets were aimed at approximately the same age range as Hero Factory sets. The more complex story did appeal a bit more to older audiences, but the goal was always to appeal to the younger end of that age range.Furthermore, I don't know how you think The Simpsons of all things is childish. I don't think it's as inappropriate for kids as some people make it out to be, but it's still a prime-time sitcom, despite being a cartoon. Something that isn't edgy or serious isn't automatically aimed at a younger audience, just as something that IS serious or complex isn't necessarily aimed at an older audience. This seems to be a concept a lot of BIONICLE fans have long struggled with. Then again, part of BIONICLE's aim was always to target a demographic of kids who thought they were "too cool" or "too grown-up" for regular LEGO, so it's hardly surprising that a lot of BIONICLE fans remember it less for what it was and more for what they wanted to think it was.

 

Firefly sets were turned down for one reason and one reason alone:Inara.

It was actually kind of funny at the time to watch the Cuusoo people be all supportive of the project and then go and actually watch Firefly and go "Whoa, I dunno if this is gonna work." (It was an awesome model for an awesome series, but alas it wasn't meant to be.)

 

The issue here isn't necessarily that the LEGO Cuusoo moderators didn't know about Firefly's content. The issue is that the approval process for LEGO Cuusoo projects is not done by one monolithic entity. The LEGO Cuusoo moderators, whose job it is to congratulate project creators on their success and warn them about things that might present challenges during review, are not the only ones involved in making the final decision on whether the project fits with the LEGO Group's brand standards or is a viable business case. There are a lot of branches of the LEGO Group that have to weigh in before a LEGO Cuusoo project is approved for production, and they may not always have the same ideas on whether a franchise is appropriate for kids or for the company's brand image.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...