Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Welcome to BZPower!

Hi there, while we hope you enjoy browsing through the site, there's a lot more you can do if you register. The process is easy and you can use your Google, Facebook, or Twitter account to make it even faster. Some perks of joining include:
  • Create your own topics, participate in existing discussions, and vote in polls
  • Show off your creations, stories, art, music, and movies and play member and staff-run games
  • Enter contests to win free LEGO sets and other prizes, and vote to decide the winners
  • Participate in raffles, including exclusive raffles for new members, and win free LEGO sets
  • Send private messages to other members
  • Organize with other members to attend or send your MOCs to LEGO fan events all over the world
  • Much, much more!
Enjoy your visit!

Photo

Death


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 Offline delilah

delilah
  • Premier Member
  • Premier Members
  • Real Canadian Maple Syrup

  • 3,913 posts
  •  

Posted Dec 01 2013 - 01:43 AM

We are so unacquainted with death

We know him only in cold hallways

We meet him only in dim rooms

Or under fluorescent lights

 

His name is not spoken at weddings

We do not sing his songs

 

Even a funeral is a celebration of life

 

...

 

But this should not be so

 

Death is written into our genes

As much a part of us as our fingernails

 

Even this drumbeat in my chest keeps time

Marking the steps in my dance

Towards the only one who waits

With open arms.

 

 

***

 

 

The first line of this poem came to me while I was standing in a hospital. I looked down at the ugly tiled floors and squinted against the harsh lights and wondered at how we run from death. It's something we try not to think about; it's something we avoid speaking of unless absolutely necessary. While some cultures may have a more cordial relationship with death, North Americans definitely do not. The only time we allow ourselves to dwell on death is in hospitals, in graveyards, and on those deep summer nights when we surround ourselves with friends and dare to think, for a moment, about the incredibly fragile nature of life.

 

But death is a part of life. It's the other side of the coin. A corpse isn't something to be afraid of: it's the still, quiet conclusion of the story that began with a baby brought, red and crying, into the world. Every prologue needs an epilogue; every beginning needs an end. It's not scary: it's the way it's meant to be.

 

Just some thoughts I had today in a hospital.

 

-E


  • 1

heytherecopy_zps41588106.jpg


#2 Offline Toast of Awesomeness

Toast of Awesomeness
  • Members
  • Seeker

  • 226 posts
  •  

Posted Dec 03 2013 - 08:37 PM

You have a gift with words. That was beautiful, and thought provoking. That first line is just so incredible, and the message is so true, and the ending wraps it up completely.If I'm to critique, and really I should try or this post is rather pointless, my only (very minor) complaint would be the line about the funeral- saying "a" funeral breaks what I saw as the rhythm of the piece. That's just a personal preference though, so take it with a grain of salt, and know that it didn't impact my enjoyment of the piece.For something that just came to you, this is absolutely inspired. Keep writing, I'd love to read more. You have a gift.
  • 0

Well, would you just look at that?

Posted Image

I'm a piece of toast.


#3 Offline badabababa obesity

badabababa obesity
  • Members
  • Fragmentation Mended

  • 6,675 posts
  •  

Posted Jan 25 2014 - 10:52 PM

It's a crime that this hasn't gotten more recognition. But I guess part of its beauty is how it goes unnoticed like its subject. Now I can feel like a hipster by saying it's among my favorite poems. :P As a recent victim of hospitalization, I thought some of these same thoughts (though the injury was nowhere near-fatal :) ) and this poem explored the topic expertly, capturing the essence of finality in 90 words. The afterword was easy to appreciate and reigned in my thoughts perfectly. In conclusion, thank you for this piece. It gave me something meaningful to think about.


  • 0

BZPRPG Profiles

IC:
 
"It comes with the job," Halfimus explained, "I'm not paid enough to give anything outside quick flavour descriptions."
 
So pay me more AuRon.





0 user(s) are browsing this forum

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users