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You're gonna have to glue the masks on too, 'cause even without the eyestalks I can't move the heads without slipping the masks right off and I bet nobody else can either :P

Has anyone tried slightly bending their mask clips inward to keep them on sturdier? I don't know if that's better or worse than superglue

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When I first saw the way the moved, I thought I had put it in wrong or the part was defective. I honestly have no idea why they thought that was a good idea. 

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Considering how sturdy the rest of the build is in comparison, yes I find them frustrating too. It's a better mechanism for the masks coming off than the simply barely-connected originals were, but it's bothersome to have to put your finger under the eyestalk in just the right way to make any adjustment to the head without having to chase down and reattach the mask afterward.

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idk i've never had any issues with them unless i roughly shift the head one direction or the other. (and i spent a long time messing around with some of them x.x)

 

the masks, for me, stay on better than the 2001 and 2002 Toa (which is kinda nice since they seemed to want to bring back the mask knocking off feature).

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Yeah, I haven't really had any problem with my masks, honestly. Maybe I'm just not very rough with my sets.

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I think it's a fun feature. I haven't had any real problem with it. Maybe I'm just not rough with my sets, or maybe I'm just used to adapting the way I move the head depending on the demands of the set in question and the direction I want to move it.

 

Even if it does bother you, I see no need to resort to gluing. I imagine a small wad of sticky tack would be enough to prevent wobbling without damaging the ability to use the pieces individually.

 

As for the reason for the feature, it's the same as the stud connections in 2001 — a play feature to add a competitive role-play element to the sets. Only this time, the designers wanted to make sure that people understood it was an intentional play feature and not just a faulty connection point.

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